Guide to commoner causes of leg pain

In children

Adolescents and young adults

Adults

Osteitis or other infections Bone tumour

Stress fracture tibia

Bone tumours (especially osteoid osteoma, osteoclastoma, osteosarcoma) Brodie's abscess

Anterior compartment syndromes

Paget's disease

'Ruptured plantaris tendon'

Painful conditions of the foot

Syphilis

Bone tumours

PID and spinal stenosis

Vascular insufficiency

Paget's disease

'Ruptured plantaris tendon'

Painful conditions of the foot

Syphilis

Bone tumours

Curing Period Tibia Bone FractureCuring Period Tibia Bone FractureCuring Period Tibia Bone Fracture

11.1. Inspection (1): Soft tissue swelling: Note the site and extent of any swelling. In the case of oedema, note particularly if bilateral (suggesting a general rather than a local cause). Unilateral leg oedema in women over 40 is a common sign of intrapelvic neoplasm.

11.2. Inspection (2): Localized oedema:

Localized oedema is common over inflammatory lesions and stress fractures.

11.3. Inspection (3): Local bone swelling: This is suggestive of neoplasm (e.g. osteoid osteoma) or old fracture. Multiple or single exostoses commonly occur in the tibia in diaphyseal aclasis. Thickening of the ends of the tibia is seen in rickets and in osteoarthritis.

Curing Period Tibia Bone FractureCuring Period Tibia Bone Fracture
Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis

Thank you for deciding to learn more about the disorder, Osteoarthritis. Inside these pages, you will learn what it is, who is most at risk for developing it, what causes it, and some treatment plans to help those that do have it feel better. While there is no definitive “cure” for Osteoarthritis, there are ways in which individuals can improve their quality of life and change the discomfort level to one that can be tolerated on a daily basis.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment