History

The first reports of a disease probably caused by Ross River virus (RRV) appeared in 1928, describing epidemics of transient arthritis and rash in two Murrumbidgee River towns on the semiarid inland plains of New South Wales (NSW), south-eastern Australia. During World War II, epidemics of arthritis with rash were described in troops serving in the tropical regions of Australia and on islands to the immediate north. Most of these outbreaks were differentially diagnosed against a background of...

Clinical Features of Several Parvovirus Infections

Feline parvovirus (feline panleukopenia virus) When FPV is introduced into a susceptible population of cats, all will become infected, although many will have subclinical symptoms. Kittens are especially at risk, with mortality on average 50 . Perinatal infections can result in cerebellar hypoplasia, and if the infected animal survives it will display a distinctive ataxia that normally lasts for the lifetime of the animal. FPV also causes panleukopenia, a marked depression of all white cells....

Pathogenesis Pathology and Histopathology

There is limited information on the pathogenesis of uncomplicated rubella because of the benign nature of the illness. With respect to the complications that can accompany acute rubella, the postinfectious encephalitis is thought to be autoimmune in nature since rubella virus cannot be isolated from cerebrospinal fluid or the brain at autopsy. Interestingly, however, extensive inflammation and demyelination are not observed. In a few cases of rubella arthritis, the presence of rubella virus in...