Glenohumeral Joint

Cure Arthritis Naturally

Cure Arthritis Naturally

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Osteoarthritis of the glenohumeral joint may be associated with aging, occupation, sports, or accidental trauma. Bone diseases such as epiphyseal dysplasia, crystal deposition, hemophilia, or alkaptonuria may also cause osteoarthritis in this joint. The usual pathological sequence is chondrolysis with articular narrowing, hypertrophy with eburnation and osteophyto-sis, and cystic formation.

Radiography shows eburnation, marginal sclerosis, and cystic change with articular nar rowing most typically in the anterior and inferior aspects of the joint. The inferomedial aspect of the humeral head and apposing rim of the glenoid fossa are also involved (Fig. 9.24). Glenohumeral osteoarthritis is often associated with the shoulder impingement syndrome (Fig. 9.25) and rarely complicated with subluxation (Fig. 9.26). When osteoarthritis is associated with impingement, cystic change may occur in the greater tuberosity at the site of the supraspinatus tendon attachment along with subacromial spur (Fig. 9.25). Our observation

Cysts Greater Tuberosity

Fig. 9.25A, B Glenohumeral osteoarthritis associated with shoulder impingement syndrome. A Anteroposteri-or radiograph of a chronic painful right shoulder in an 82-year-old male shows marked narrowing of the lower glenohumeral articular compartment (arrowheads) and also osteopenia and cystic changes in the greater tuberos-ity (pair of arrows) and subacromial spur (single arrow). B Anterior pinhole scan reveals intense tracer uptake in the respective lesions including the greater tuberosity (large arrow) and the acromion (ac) where the supraspi-natus tendon attaches (small arrow)

Fig. 9.25A, B Glenohumeral osteoarthritis associated with shoulder impingement syndrome. A Anteroposteri-or radiograph of a chronic painful right shoulder in an 82-year-old male shows marked narrowing of the lower glenohumeral articular compartment (arrowheads) and also osteopenia and cystic changes in the greater tuberos-ity (pair of arrows) and subacromial spur (single arrow). B Anterior pinhole scan reveals intense tracer uptake in the respective lesions including the greater tuberosity (large arrow) and the acromion (ac) where the supraspi-natus tendon attaches (small arrow)

Humeral Head Osteitis

Fig. 9.26A, B Glenohumeral osteoarthritis complicated with subluxation. A Anteroposterior radiograph of the right shoulder in a 64-year-old female shows craniolateral displacement of the humeral head with widened articular space (arrowheads). Bones are markedly porotic with accentuated cortices. B Anterior pinhole scan reveals prominent tracer uptake in the widened glenohumeral joint (lower arrowheads). Note increased tracer uptake in the acromion (top arrowhead) and greater tuberosity (left arrowhead) suggesting impingement or rotator cuff syndrome

Fig. 9.26A, B Glenohumeral osteoarthritis complicated with subluxation. A Anteroposterior radiograph of the right shoulder in a 64-year-old female shows craniolateral displacement of the humeral head with widened articular space (arrowheads). Bones are markedly porotic with accentuated cortices. B Anterior pinhole scan reveals prominent tracer uptake in the widened glenohumeral joint (lower arrowheads). Note increased tracer uptake in the acromion (top arrowhead) and greater tuberosity (left arrowhead) suggesting impingement or rotator cuff syndrome has indicated that the radiographic change in the humeral head is often less impressive than the scintigraphic change in the relatively early or active chronic stage of the disease when the metabolic activity is at its height (Fig. 9.27). Such a mismatch can be explained at least in part by disuse that can be diagnosed by osteo-penia.

Pinhole scintigraphy shows increased tracer uptake in the articular surface of the glenoid fossa and humeral head (Fig. 9.24B). As mentioned above, the scintigraphic features often precede the radiographic change (Fig. 9.27). In moderately advanced cases the joint becomes diffusely obliterated and subcortical cyst, if formed, is indicated by "hotter area within hot area" (Fig. 9.25B). Subluxation is represented by the displacement of the humeral head and widened joint space (Fig. 9.26B).

Uptake Humerus Head

Fig. 9.27A, B Disparity between scintigraphic and radiographic osteoarthritic change in the early stage. A Anteroposterior radiograph of a painful right shoulder in a 56-year-old male shows no abnormality on the humeral side (?) and mild sclerosis in the lower glenoid (arrows). B In contrast, the anterior pinhole scan reveals prominent tracer uptake in both the humerus and the glenoid (arrows)

Fig. 9.27A, B Disparity between scintigraphic and radiographic osteoarthritic change in the early stage. A Anteroposterior radiograph of a painful right shoulder in a 56-year-old male shows no abnormality on the humeral side (?) and mild sclerosis in the lower glenoid (arrows). B In contrast, the anterior pinhole scan reveals prominent tracer uptake in both the humerus and the glenoid (arrows)

Bone Scan Showing Female Lower Parts

Fig. 9.28A, B Relatively early osteoarthritis in the sternoclavicular joint. A Plain anteroposteriorradiograph of a painful right sternoclavicular joint in a 50-year-old female shows periarticular bone erosion, osteopenia and eburnation (arrowheads). Note false articular widening due to chondrolysis and osteopenia. B Anterior pinhole scan reveals slightly increased uptake in periarticular bones (arrows). The uptake is not impressive

Fig. 9.28A, B Relatively early osteoarthritis in the sternoclavicular joint. A Plain anteroposteriorradiograph of a painful right sternoclavicular joint in a 50-year-old female shows periarticular bone erosion, osteopenia and eburnation (arrowheads). Note false articular widening due to chondrolysis and osteopenia. B Anterior pinhole scan reveals slightly increased uptake in periarticular bones (arrows). The uptake is not impressive

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Arthritis Joint Pain

Arthritis Joint Pain

Arthritis is a general term which is commonly associated with a number of painful conditions affecting the joints and bones. The term arthritis literally translates to joint inflammation.

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Responses

  • mildred
    What is subcortical cystic in both glcohumeral joints?
    7 years ago
  • Monica
    What is periarticular uptake in the glenohumeral?
    4 years ago

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