Berries

While some of these berries are delicious and safe to eat. either fresh or cooked, others are strictly for medicinal use only and should always be taken under the supervision of a professional herbalist. Compounds in bilberries called anthocyanosides have potent antioxidant properties, which contribute to the herb's many benefits, particularly for vision and eye health. The berry contains an oily extract that has been clinically proven to reduce symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH . 3...

Devils flaw

Harpagophytum procumbens Part used Tubers Devil's claw grows in the grasslands of southern Africa and has been used there as a topical treatment for ulcers and wounds, and taken internally for fevers, allergies, digestive problems and as a pain reliever. Numerous scientific studies confirm its benefits, most notably as an effective analgesic and anti-inflammatory for arthritis pain and backache. Some studies have shown devil's claw to be ss effective as pharmaceutical painkillers ind...

The beauty of herbs

Herbs form such a diverse group of plants, from groundcovers to shrubs and trees, that there are herbs to suit any climate, soil type and position. Even if you live in an apartment with a small balcony or have no outdoor space at all, you can still grow culinary herbs in a window box. And herbs are incredibly versatile. Take the elder, for example. A deciduous shrub or tree that grows to about 20 ft. (6 m), in summer it produces clusters of tiny, creamy white scented flowers that attract bees,...

Celery

Capsicums Long Shape

Rich in vitamins and minerals, wild celery has been used as a food and flavoring since ancient Egyptian limes. The Greeks crowned the victors in the Nemean Games with garlands of its leaves, and also made funeral wreaths from them. Other common names Cutting leaf celery, smallage Parts used Leaves, seeds, roots Ceteriac is a selected form of Apium graveolens with a very large taproot, which is grown as a root vegetable. Slice off the rough, tough outer skin rather than peel it, then use it raw...

Liite willow bark

The bark of the white willow tree is believed to have been used as an herbal painkiller since at least the time of Hippocrates. Laboratory tests have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties of its aspirin-like substances. Most (but not all) clinical trials also support its role in relieving the pain of osteoarthritis, but there has not been enough research to confirm its effectiveness in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. 0 DOS < 11. Take commercial white willow...