Miracles Dream On

Charlatans prey on mature adults with promises of easy cures or ways to stay young. Many products they peddle are foods, substances from food, or supplements. No substantial evidence is provided for many claims that their products offer benefits for treating arthritis, cancer, Alzheimer's disease, or other maladies-or for helping people live longer.

Many "miracle" products are costly. Money used to buy them is better spent on healthful, flavorful foods.

Their harm may go farther than the pocketbook. These remedies may mask symptoms, offer false hope, or worse yet, keep people from seeking reliable healthcare. These products also may interfere with the action of prescribed medications-or perhaps with the absorption of nutrients in food.

Always be cautious of promises that seem too good to be true. To learn how to judge what you read and hear about nutrition and health, see chapter 24. Always consult your doctor or a registered dietitian before trying these products-or any alternative healthcare. Chapter 23 explores what's known and unknown about many supplements, some promoted as "antiaging." Many people claim to be nutrition experts, but some aren't qualified. To find a registered dietitian, other qualified health expert, or resources in your community, see chapter 24.

lead to anemia and age-related hearing loss. Along with other B vitamins, folate from food may play a role in heart health, by removing homocysteine from the bloodstream; high homocysteine levels are a potential risk factor for heart disease. Good sources: leafy green vegetables, some fruits, legumes, liver, fortified cereals, other grain foods, and wheat germ.

Vitamin B12. Vitamin B12, or cobalamin, works with folate to make red blood cells. Not getting enough

Your Heart and Nutrition

Your Heart and Nutrition

Prevention is better than a cure. Learn how to cherish your heart by taking the necessary means to keep it pumping healthily and steadily through your life.

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