Anaerobic Bacteria And Inflammation Research

Parenteral antibiotic therapy should be initiated immediately after aspiration of the joint, and the choice of therapy should be directed by results of Gram's stain and bacterial cultures. Adequate penetration into the joint is essential. Therapy of anaerobic arthritis is not different from that required for arthritis caused by aerobes, including treatment of any underlying disease, appropriate drainage and debridement, temporary immobilization of the joint, and antimicrobial therapy pertinent...

Clinical Clues to Diagnosis of Anaerobic Infections

Infections caused by anaerobic bacteria are common and may be serious and life-threatening. Anaerobes are the predominant components of the bacterial flora of normal human skin and mucous membranes, and are therefore a common cause of bacterial infections of endogenous origin. Infections due to anaerobic bacteria can evolve all body systems and sites (1). The predominant ones include abdominal, pelvic, respiratory, and skin and soft tissues infections. Because of their fastidious nature, they...

Diagnosis

Severe systemic findings such as fever, malaise, and vomiting may be present. Pain may be severe motion is limited, and the joint is splinted by muscular spasm. In infants this may produce pseudoparalysis. An effusion occurs but may not be palpable at first. The overlying tissues become swollen, tender, and warm. As the infection proceeds, contractures and muscular atrophy may result. Polyarticular arthritis is generally seen in gonococcal disease, viral infections, Lyme disease, reactive...

References

Welkon CJ, Long SS, Fisher MC, Alburger PD. Pyogenic arthritis in infants and children a review of 95 cases. Pediatr Infect Dis J 1986 5 669-76. 2. Tarkowski A. Infection and musculoskeletal conditions infectious arthritis. Best Pract Res Clin Rheumatol 2006 20 1029-44. 3. Broadhurst LE, Erickson RL, Kelley PW. Decreases in invasive Haemophilus influenzae diseases in U.S. Army children, 1984-1991. JAMA 1993 269 227-31. 4. Adams WG, Deaver KA, Cochi SL, et al. Decline of childhood Haemophilus...

Microbiology

The etiology of acute hematogenous osteomyelitis varies with age in newborns-S. aureus, enteric gram-negative bacteria and group B streptococci predominate in older children-S. aureus, group A streptococci, H. influenzae, and enteric gram-negative bacteria are the most frequent isolates. In adult the commonest species are S. aureus and occasionally enteric gramnegative bacteria, Streptococcus spp. and anaerobes. S. aureus is the most common organism recovered from infected bones, accounting for...

Index

Abdominal infections, 233-243 Abdominal manifestation, actinomycosis and, 203, 205 Abscess es anorectal, 270-271 cutaneous, 267-269 dentoalveolar, 106-108 diabetic, 280 intra-abdominal, 240 liver, 233-234 pancreatic, 241-242 pelvic, 263 perinephric, 250-252 periodontitis, 15, 39,104-111,108-113, 215-216 pilonidal, 271-272 renal, 250-252 retroperitioneal, 235 spleenic, 235 tubo-ovarian, 263 Acidaminococcus, 8-9 Acne lesions, pustular, 273-274 Actinomyces, 1-9, 14, 15, 30, 89, 95, 103-106, 110,...

Fusobacterium Species

Oral Gram Stain

Cells of Fusobacterium spp. are moderately long and thin with tapered ends and have typical fusiform morphology. The species of Fusobacterium seen most often in clinical infections are Fusobacterium nucleatum, Fusobacterium necrophorum, Fusobacterium mortiferum, and Fusobacterium varium. F. nucleatum is the predominant Fusobacterium from clinical specimens, often associated with infections of the mouth, lung 38,60 , and brain 37 . They are often isolated from abscesses, obstetrical and...